Exhibit B: Mi'kmaq for Bostonians

Bay Staters and members of the Mi’kmaq, an Indian tribe concentrated in Canada, have a long history. Back on July 19, 1776, Massachusetts Bay and Mi’kmaq leaders met to sign the Treaty of Watertown, our fledgling nation’s first military alliance. (For the occasion, a copy of the two-week-old Declaration of Independence was delivered and translated for tribal elders, who proclaimed, "We like it well.") It should sadden Bostonians, then, to learn that the Mi’kmaq language is now in danger of disappearing, according to a new report from the United Nations. There are only about 8,000 speakers left, 1,300 of them in the Boston area (still home to the largest Mi’kmaq community outside Canada). "We’d love to see everybody speak it," says tribe member Joanne Dunn, director of the North American Indian Center of Boston. "But it’s hard for anyone to hold on to their language in a city like this." To do our small part to ensure the language’s survival, we’ve compiled the brief phrase guide below. Speakers of another local tongue should note: "It’s very difficult to speak Mi’kmaq with a Boston accent," says Dunn.

HELLO.
Kwe’ (kway)

GOODBYE.
Atiu (ah-do)

HOW ARE YOU?
Me’ talwle’in (may taw-lin)

THANK YOU.

Wela’lin (wuh-lah-leen)

IT LOOKS LIKE IT’S GOING TO RAIN.

Gigpesanamu’g (gik-pes-an-ah-muug)

YANKEES SUCK!

Yankees awanmilita’jik! (Yankees a-wan-mee-lee-ta-jeek!)

  • lorraine

    like the site . agree with language loss . been there done that . try to speak with bostonian accent . got laughed at so did not try to speak any more .