Forecast: May

| Boston Magazine |

LEGENDS
05/17 AEROSMITH TOME REVIVES THE GLORY DAYS

Fans still smarting over the delays on the band’s next album, take heart: Aerosmith: Essential Interviews, out today, should tide you over. In one of the collected chats, a giddy Steven Tyler sums up the band’s good fortune in 1973: "We’ve sold over, what is it? 110,000 albums…. We sold more albums in Boston than J. Geils." Indeed. The book’s stroll down memory lane corresponds nicely with this summer’s world tour with hirsute classic rockers ZZ Top.


ANGLING
05/01 FISHING SEASON STARTS; FISHING INDUSTRY CRUMBLES

It’s already been a painful year for our notoriously beleaguered fishermen: In February, hopes for a rumored $156 million in federal stimulus cash were crushed when no such plan materialized. And so as the commercial fishing season opens, don’t expect boats to be racing off the Gloucester and New Bedford docks. In an effort to restore nature’s stocks, the National Marine Fisheries Service introduced an interim rule, effective today, that reduces by 18 percent the number of days New England boats can work the ocean—a conservation-minded move that a group of local anglers says will end up costing them an estimated $17.4 million. It could have been worse: Fishermen and their legislative allies shouted down an earlier, more restrictive version of the rule set to trim the catch by about $30 million annually. (Senator John Kerry decried the original proposal as "a deathblow to the economic future of the region’s most storied industry.") The interim regulation will stay in effect only until next year, when new catch limits—which rely on weight quotas rather than caps on days at sea—become standard. Fishermen hope there will still be enough of them left to regulate.

HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
05/01 GREAT NEWS IF IT SNOWS THIS SUMMER

NStar, the Hub-based utility with over a million Bay State customers, is dropping the price of natural gas by 70 percent today. Before you rush out to hunt down CEO Tom May to give him a hug, understand that the cost-cutting is a result of the declining price of gas on the futures market.

ENLIGHTENMENT
05/02 ZEN AND THE ART OF CROWD CONTROL
After launching MIT’s Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values, the Dalai Lama speaks at Gillette Stadium. The Foxboro visit includes a lecture on peace and happiness. Don’t expect many fights over parking spaces.
ticketmaster.com.

BOATING
05/04 BIG SCORE FOR BOATERS WHO CAN STILL AFFORD THEIR TOYS

The state Department of Conservation and Recreation today announces the lottery winners of mooring permits in the Charles River. The 60 lucky skippers will be allowed to anchor in a stretch of water just past the Longfellow Bridge on the Cambridge side of the Chuck. A heck of a lot cheaper than marina fees, the mooring permits are good until mid-November—which could save the recession-addled boat owner almost seven months of rent.

CONCERTS 05/08
Etta James plays the House of Blues, providing the Lansdowne Street venue with some truth in advertising.
houseofblues.com.

Consider This
Questions you’ll have reason to ask this month

Just how cash-strapped is the Globe‘s parent company? When execs at the New York Times Company set 5/1 as the mother of all deadlines for the Globe, they weren’t just picking a date out of thin air—they knew they faced a reckoning on account of their $400 million line of credit expiring this month. How will they pay back the debt that comes due? Well, having a plan to sell assets like the Globe and the Sox might help. We’ll get a glimpse of the Times Company’s books when it files its next statement with the SEC, due 5/11.   

Is your kid ready to rock the MCAS? The state begins using data from this month’s MCAS to track students as they move from grade to grade, instead of comparing each class with the one that came before it. This will provide a longer view of performance—and should obliterate the old excuse from schools that variations in test scores reflect a particularly gifted or challenged class.  

Is Clark Rockefeller crazy (legally, we mean)? The con man’s kidnapping trial is set for this month. His lawyer plans an insanity defense and has also pushed to get the proceedings moved out of Boston. Seems the braggart who relished making a name for himself in the Hub got a bit more well known around here than his attorney would prefer. GEOFFREY GAGNON