Forecast: June

CARBON FOOTPRINTS
06/25 REAPING SOME GREEN FOR GOING GREEN

With $42 million in federal cash on offer for energy-efficiency programs, municipalities have until today to submit applications to the state. Any burg with a population greater than 35,000 is eligible; Boston alone has a potential $6.5 million coming its way, and Cambridge could claim up to $1.1 million. Stay tuned for exciting new wind-turbine controversies in Quincy and Revere.

TRANSITIONS
06/25 CHANGING OF THE GUARD AT THE BOSTON FOUNDATION

The Boston Foundation board holds elections to replace five of its members, including Reverend Ray Hammond, who’s been chair since 2002. A surgeon before he became a pastor and driving force behind the so-called Boston Miracle, Hammond helmed the foundation’s board at a time when its assets grew to top $800 million. Which means his successor—who’ll take over on 6/30—has some big shoes to fill, especially since the economy is no longer cooperating.

NUPTIALS 06/27
Sox owner John Henry weds Linda Pizzuti. What to get the couple who have everything? Their Bloomie’s registry offers some ideas.
bloomingdales.weddingchannel.com.

PUBLICITY STUNTS
06/29 WTKK HOST CRIES TYRANNY, GETS HIS DAY IN COURT

Conservative-radio yakker Michael Graham, who got tossed in the clink on account of a pesky red light and a revoked driver’s license, appears in Framingham District Court today. Never one to miss a trick, Graham refused the prosecutor’s offer to drop the charges and settle things for $200. Instead, the host, who says he was never told his driving privileges had been yanked, is itching for a revolution and wants to use the trial to blast Rachel Kaprielian, the state’s registrar of motor vehicles, for what he contends are the agency’s shoddy notification practices.

GOINGS-AWAY
06/30 BOSS’s LAST DAY AT ROSE MUSEUM

When Brandeis University officials announced in January that they’d shutter the college’s art museum in June, the backlash was immediate and intense. Since then, Brandeis brass has backed/stumbled away from the plan by delaying a decision on whether to follow through on it. But definitely not being spared are museum director Michael Rush and some members of his staff, who get the boot today—a move that can’t bode well for those clamoring to keep the place open long term.    

BEST PARTS
THE HIGH POINTS OF THIS MONTH’S CULTURAL HIGHLIGHTS

EXHIBIT Opening 6/7 at the Museum of Science, the National geographic Crittercam show gives audiences the chance to see the world from animals’ perspectives, via cameras stuck to creatures ranging from a whale to a lion. As Happy Feet fans, we’re betting on the penguin’s footage to win the prize for most adorable.

FOOD The three-day Jimmy Fund Scooper Bowl begins on 6/9, offering an all-you-can-eat smorgasbord of ice cream at City Hall Plaza. Familiar favorites like mint–chocolate chip tend to draw long lines, so the smart move is to expand your palate. (A gem like Vanilla Honey Bee, an underappreciated concoction from Häagen-Dazs, would be a good start.)

MUSIC Violin virtuoso Andrew Bird’s new disc, Noble Beast, is full of intimate, string-laden tunes, the kind that makes him perfect for small venues. But now, as he’s grown in popularity, Bird is obliged to play comparatively cavernous stages. So as much as you may love the new stuff, expect his bigger-sounding, more-electric numbers (like "Plasticities" from 2007′s Armchair Apocrypha) to be the ones that really bring the house down when he headlines the Bank of America Pavilion on 6/19.

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