Forecast: November

BARGAIN
11/18 THE YEAR’S BEST ART SALE BEGINS
The annual five-day sale starting today at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts is your chance to snap up work by students and alumni like famed photographer Nan Goldin. MFA director Malcolm Rogers could win some friends by showing up with his checkbook: Although he took a pay cut in the wake of museum layoffs last April, he did see his salary jump 23 percent last year. smfa.edu/insideout-sale.

CONTROVERSY
11/23 LAST CHANCE FOR WINDMILL-TILTING
Even though it nixes big commercial wind farms in Buzzards Bay, the state’s proposed Ocean Management Plan is nonetheless stirring emotions over the prospect of offshore windmills. The plan could still allow for small-scale projects, so expect conservationists and capitalists alike to get one last word in before the public comment period ends today, after which the draft plan becomes law.

BUSINESS
11/23 BIOGEN’S FIVE-YEAR HANGOVER
Reacting to the news five years ago today that the FDA had approved Biogen Idec’s breakthrough drug Tysabri, CEO James Mullen predicted it would "revolutionize" the treatment of multiple sclerosis. But things quickly soured for the Cambridge-based biotech: Tysabri was pulled from the market a year later when it was discovered that patients were coming down with a sometimes-fatal brain infection.

Since the drug’s reintroduction in 2006, 13 more cases of infection have been reported. Three of those reports were confirmed this September, resulting in a dip in stock price and a prediction from Barclays that the Tysabri headlines could further hurt Biogen’s Wall Street performance—which could make investor and longtime takeover threat Carl Icahn all the more dangerous.

DEADLINE 11/24
In case he’s got a little late-season drama in mind, today is the last day Curt Schilling (or you!) can file to run for the Bay State’s open Senate seat.

TELEVISION
11/30 NESN’S BLOND AMBITION CONTINUES
Today Newton native Jade McCarthy signs off as a sports reporter at Philadelphia’s NBC affiliate and preps for her next assignment: In January she becomes the latest flaxen-haired NESN reporter, joining the ever-popular Kathryn Tappen and Heidi Watney.

BEST PARTS
The high points of this month’s cultural highlights.

COMEDY With a mix of humor and heart, storytelling standup Mike Birbiglia has conquered This American Life and Comedy Central. Audiences at his 11/6 and 11/7 Wilbur Theatre shows will note that he’s at his sharpest when recalling his days as a goofy kid in Shrewsbury.

CONCERT Recent cool-kid interest in Brian Wilson‘s orchestrated pop harmonies has sent legions of indie youths scurrying to kneel at his throne. For those new disciples unfamiliar with Wilson’s awkward presence, the onstage banter during his show at Lowell Memorial Auditorium on 11/12 can offer a peek into the mind of a haunted genius—especially when delivered in juxtaposition with a happy-go-lucky Beach Boys gem like "Good Vibrations."

DANCE
It’s been almost two decades since then-20-year-old choreographer Trey McIntyre debuted his first work for the Houston Ballet, and, unlike many wunderkinds, he continues to make good on his early promise. When the Trey McIntyre Project appears at the ICA 11/20–11/22, watch for the dramatic The Sun Road, which uses video projections of Montana’s Glacier National Park to underscore the chasm that’s developed between man and nature.

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