Wedding Hairstyles: The Mane Dilemma

OVAL
Tim Robishaw

An oval shape is versatile because it’s proportional: There’s no need to hide a high forehead or downplay a sharp chin. While you can get away with almost any look, a surefire option is a chignon or bun.

Darren Le
A loosely pulled-back style, with a bit of volume and a side-swept bang, works well. But whatever you do, don’t go for a center part: It’ll just make your face look longer.

SQUARE
Tim Robishaw

Adding waves, whether they’re gently pulled back or left down, softens your face shape. Stay away from taut updos, which only draw attention to an angular jaw.

Darren Le
You should have something loose around the jawline, so a half-up, half-down look is a good choice. Just make sure you don’t pull your hair back too tight.

HEART
Tim Robishaw

Gals with a wide forehead that narrows to a pointy chin are prime candidates for a half-up, half-down style. Sleekness around the crown minimizes a prominent forehead, while the fullness below softens the chin.

Darren Le
A classic French twist is a sure bet. To modernize the look, make it fairly loose and add long, side-swept bangs that draw the eye away from the chin and hide the forehead.

ROUND
Tim Robishaw

To elongate this silhouette, create soft, loose waves. (Pin-straight hair emphasizes roundness.) Subtle layers remove bulk and make your face appear slimmer, but steer clear of anything choppy.

Darren Le
Think of a moderate pompadour: A ‘do that’s soft—not slicked back—around your face but smoothly structured elsewhere. Height around the crown lengthens your visage.

Tim Robishaw, Jeffrey Lyle Salon, 135 Newbury St., Boston, 617-391-0551, jeffreylyle.com; Darren Le, Mizu, 776 Boylston St., Boston, 617-585-6498, mizuforhair.com.

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