Fast Times at Marina Bay?

By Alyssa Giacobbe | Boston Magazine |

HE WAS DRAWN TO FLASH, and a little bit of danger, perhaps not so uncharacteristic for a man who made a living in luxury real estate. There was the boat, a sleek 47-foot cigarette model, the sports cars, including a Ferrari and a Jaguar, the private helicopter. He told the girl he’d fly her to Martha’s Vineyard in that helicopter. He said he had to be very careful with her because she was so young.

They first met in the summer of 2009. He was somewhere around 70. She was 14. She went to his condo, she later told police, on something of a pretense, invited by a girl she knew simply as Kookie.

“You just have to watch,” said Kookie, a 19-year-old aspiring nanny who said she planned to have sex with the man. He was rich, one of the richest in Quincy, and he would give them money.

And so, as the girl would later tell police while laying out her version of events, she and Kookie took a cab to his condo in Marina Bay, the kind of luxury development that attracted athletes and high rollers, and judging from the place — a sprawling duplex with a Jacuzzi in the bedroom, mirrors that covered the walls and ceiling, and a skyline view of Boston — the man fit right in. The girl stood at the corner of the bed as Kookie and the man removed their clothes and put them on the floor. On the television, the girl could hear newscasters prattling on about earthquakes in California. Watching the two of them have sex, as she had been instructed to do, was awkward. At some point, the girl later told police, he called her over. He wanted her to have sex with Kookie while he watched. He also wanted to have sex with her.

She was scared — mostly, she later told police, because this was not the plan she and Kookie had discussed, but also because he was so old. “It’s okay,” he told her. He didn’t force her. She didn’t say no. According to police, Kookie held her hand, the older girl giving the younger a look as if to say, “It will all be over soon.” And it was. He ejaculated on her shirt, which she later threw away. Then he put on his pants, walked to the bathroom, and returned with $200 in cash for each of them.

  • Christopher

    I’ve worked for large daily press but find that I have much more ability to say what I have to say on my own. I have spoken with Ms. Giacobbe on this matter and look forward to reading her work when I have some down time TH morning!

    Mine is found at KingCast65 YouTube or at KingCast blog just search for the names top left corner, videos court docs and all of that.

  • sunil

    The Porsche never moved. O’Connell opened the door and shot Fasano!

  • MIKE
  • jon

    Oconnells have money they don’t . No matter what u don’t shoot someone. It is a smear campaign . Even if it was a homeless man on the side of a road u don’t shoot someone.

  • lou

    BBy. The time fasano got out ,oconnell could have sped way n been home he was in a porche they were in a jeep

  • SUNIL
  • Danielle

    Everyone is all about the money and will take all they can get to those who are the most giving.

  • sunil
  • sunil
  • sunil
  • sunil
  • sunil

    Chris King is a convicted felon who worked for the defense team.

  • chris
  • MEHTA

    Per Curiam.  In December 1998, for conduct in January 1996, we suspended Christopher King, now of Dallas, Texas, Attorney Registration No. 0062199, from the practice of law in Ohio for one year, but stayed the suspension on the condition that during that year he be placed on probation and work with a mentor appointed by the relator, Columbus Bar Association.  Columbus Bar Assn. v. King (1998), 84 Ohio St.3d 174, 702 N.E.2d 862.   We also imposed costs of that proceeding on respondent.

  • gurinder

    According to the testimony, King represented Kandy Cantrell in a “slip and
    fall” tort action against her former landlord. In January 1996, King planned to file
    a complaint on Cantrell’s behalf seeking compensation for her injuries arising
    from this alleged tort. On or about January 26, King took Cantrell to Pope’s
    office, where respondents decided that Pope would telephone Cantrell’s former
    landlord to see whether the landlord would slander Cantrell. King and Pope, who
    were friends and had jointly represented another client, also decided to record the
    telephone conversation.

    Pope called the landlord and talked with the landlord’s office manager.
    Pope represented to the office manager that Pope had received a rental application
    from Cantrell. Pope did own an old warehouse building that he planned to
    renovate and lease to commercial and residential tenants. However, the building
    was far from ready for occupancy, Pope did not plan to accept children (Cantrell

  • sachin

    In December 1998, for conduct in January 1996, we suspended Christopher King, now of Dallas, Texas, Attorney Registration No. 0062199, from the practice of law in Ohio for one year, but stayed the suspension on the condition that during that year he be placed on probation and work with a mentor appointed by the relator, Columbus Bar Association.  Columbus Bar Assn. v. King (1998), 84 Ohio St.3d 174, 702 N.E.2d 862.   We also imposed costs of that proceeding on respondent.

  • CHRIS

    Further, it is significant, as to King, that he has demonstrated unacceptable
    behavior in the past. There have been at least four grievances filed with the
    Columbus Bar Association against him, and he has been sanctioned by two judges.

  • JOE

    The Nashua chapter had no knowledge of King’s intervention on Toney’s behalf, nor had any details of Toney’s case, Levesque said. When the NAACP ultimately contacted Toney, he said King had sought him, she said. Levesque said she was not aware of King’s status with the Ohio bar, and that as soon as the Nashua chapter learned of his communication with Jaffrey police he was relieved of his duties.

    King was suspended from the bar in 2001 but the suspension was not imposed so long as he met certain conditions, said Doris Roach, a clerk at the Ohio Supreme Court. However, he did not meet those conditions and was suspended in 2002.

    The New Hampshire Bar Association does not recognize King, and he is not licensed to practice in this state, Dunn said.

    Dunn said he will sue Jaffrey police and the NAACP. “There are a number of people who love to hate me, and I’m not scared of anyone,”King said.