Collier Strong: Donnie Wahlberg Narrates Short Film About MIT Officer’s Life

Interviews with family members detail what happened in the wake of the Marathon bombing.

By | Arts & Entertainment |
Screenshot via YouTube.com

Screenshot via YouTube.com

In a new mini-documentary honoring his legacy, family members of the MIT officer killed in the line of duty, in the days following the Boston Marathon bombing, spoke about the tragedy and heartbreak of losing their bother.

MIT Officer Sean Collier, the younger brother of Andrew Collier, was shot and killed three days after the April 15 bombings on Boylston Street. The suspects tied to the bombings allegedly shot Collier as he was sitting in his car at the MIT campus while on patrol.

The documentary, “Collier Strong,” sponsored by NASCAR and Fox Sports 1, includes clips from the day of the attack, and then follows Collier’s family members as they try and deal with the loss of their brother.

“Nothing is going to change what happened. Nothing is going to bring my brother back,” Andrew Collier says in the opening credits of the eight-minute film.

Collier’s sisters, Nicole Lynch and Jennifer Lemmerman, his stepsister Jenn Rogers, MIT Police Department Patrol Sergeant David O’Connor, and Somerville Police Officer Bob Ankenbauer, are all interviewed in the film.

The movie originally aired on television on November 3, twice, and was posted online the following day. Dorchester-native Donnie Wahlberg, who is also the narrator and executive producer of the show Boston’s Finest, narrates the feature about the Collier family.

Since his brother’s death, Andrew Collier has been trying to lobby Congress to designate a federal holiday honoring first responders. He created an online petition which has garnered thousands of responses through the website Change.org.

In May, Governor Deval Patrick signed a bill posthumously appointing Collier as a Somerville police officer. Collier was killed one month before finishing training to receive his badge as a Somerville cop. A memorial was set up for the officer in Cambridge, near MIT’s campus, on the six-month anniversary of his death.

  • Linda MacDonald

    I feel sorry for the loss of Officer Collier to his family. He was obviously well-loved. However, a holiday to honor first responders would only mean paying first responders more to work on their holiday. Additionally, many good Samaritans give of themselves without expectation of reward. Their job is to respond. I’m glad they do. But a special holiday? No