2013 Christmas Tree Lighting Festivals in Boston

And menorah lightings, and trellis lightings…

Twinkle, twinkle, Christmas lights, when we wonder you’ll be bright?

Oh yes, it’s that time of year against folks. Tree-lighting season kicked off this week with a brand-new light display at The Street in Chestnut Hill. Now we’re looking forward to more of our annual holiday favorites at the Common, Faneuil Hall, and more.

Mark your calendars—here are when and where these blinky, twinkly, almost seizure-inducing extravaganzas will take place:

Blink! at Faneuil Hall Marketplace

This sparkly light show debuted last year and was a rip-roaring success. Whoever decided 350,000 LED lights synched to the music of the Boston Pops was a good idea—well—we agree! This Saturday, Blink! is back with performances from A Christmas Story, Paula Cole, Keith Lockhart and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, Tufts SQ! and Pitch Slapped A Cappella, and more. And if you can’t make it to Faneuil Hall, watch the lighting ceremony from the comfort of your own home on WBZ and WSBK.

Saturday, November 23, daytime performances start at noon, light show at 7:30 p.m., Faneuil Hall, 1 Faneuil Hall Square, Boston, faneuilhallmarketplace.com.

Annual Lighting of the Trellis at Christopher Columbus Park

Trees aren’t the only things that get to be bedazzled over the holidays. Each year, Friends of the Christopher Columbus Park host a lighting ceremony for the arched trellis. The celebration includes special activities, snacks, and music.

Monday, November 25 at dusk, Christopher Columbus Park near Aquarium Station at Cross and Atlantic avenues, Boston, foccp.org.

Menorah Lighting on the Common

Starting the day before Thanksgiving (long live Thanksgivukkah!), you can partake in the eight-day lighting of a menorah on Boston Common. Presented by Chabad of Downtown Boston.

Wednesday, November 27, through Thursday, December 5, 4-4:45 p.m. daily, Boston Common near Park Street Station at the corner of Park and Tremont streets, mayorsholiday.com.

31 Nights of Lights at the Prudential Center

Each year, the Prudential Center celebrates the holidays with 31 Nights of Lights. Starting on December 1, the tower will be lit a different color to recognize an organization in Boston. This year’s participants include AIDS Action, PanMass, Alzheimer’s Association, and Avon Walk for Breast Cancer. The groups will “flip the switch” each day, along with musical performances and speakers, but for most of us, just looking up and knowing that each color has a meaning will be heartwarming enough.

Nightly December 1 through December 31, Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., Boston, full daily schedule at prudentialcenter.com.

Copley Square Holiday Tree Lighting

The Friends of Copley Square will host their annual tree-lighting ceremony with Mayor Menino on December 2. Festivities include story hour and candy cane tea at the BPL, music performances, kids’ entertainment, Jenny Johnson, Santa Claus (SANTA!), Rudolph, and more.

Monday, December 2, BPL events 4-5:30 p.m., tree lighting 5:30-6:30 p.m., Copley Square, Boston, friendsofcopleysquare.org.

Boston Common (and Commonwealth Mall) Tree Lighting

This will be Menino’s last Boston Common tree lighting as mayor (tear!) As per usual, you can expect a fantastic show by the Skating Club of Boston on the Frog Pond, music performances, Santa, and more. This year’s tree is a 47-foot white spruce gifted from Nova Scotia. Thanks, Nova Scotia! After the tree lighting at the Common, Menino will make his way over to the Commonwealth Mall, where the long rows of trees there will also be lit for the holiday season.

Thursday, December 5, Frog Pond Skating Spectacular at 5 p.m., tree lighting ceremony 6-8 p.m., mayorsholiday.com.

* Hidden Gems Alert!

Once in a long while, the government surprises us with well-thought, convenient, and functioning tools:

For more holiday tree lightings happening in Boston, check out the Bing map someone at City Hall put together at cityofboston.gov. You can sort by date and neighborhood. Well played, government!

Plus, check out the City of Boston’s full winter program for dozens and dozens of activities happening this season, from tree lightings to trolley tours and much more.

  • susu12

    Why does Nova Scotia send us a tree?

    • mli777

      In 1917, in the harbour of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, a cargo ship collided with another vessel filled with munitions for the Western Front in World War One. The latter ship subsequently exploded, killing thousands of people along the waterfront of Halifax. Boston was the first city to help the city of Halifax, Nova Scotia

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion