Rachel Slade

Rachel Slade

Executive Editor

Rachel arrived at Boston magazine six years ago, fresh from a career in architecture, to helm its design quarterly, Boston Home, and she continues to run that publication while writing and editing long-form pieces for the monthly. As articles editor, Slade seeks stories that tell us about our city through those who call it home, and she is particularly drawn to people with singular passions, from selling condos to millionaires to mucking about in city politics to practicing percussion 20 hours a day for a shot at the BSO. Not one to sit still for long, she'll happily hop on a horse, motorcycle, plane, or bike, if it'll help the story along, and in her time here, she's done all four. Rachel earned a B.A. in political science from Barnard College, an M.Arch. from the University of Pennsylvania, and built up her writing chops while shelving books at Shakespeare & Co. in NYC, back when that city was nice and gritty.

Rachel Slade'S latest stories

Deciding the Same-Sex Marriage Question

A recap of day one of Obergefell v. Hodges.

Corporate Competent Residences Approved in the Greenway

At 110 Broad Street, the city's race toward Anytown USA continues.

Prep the Next Generation to Untangle Our Mess

A short profile of Gloria Larson.

We Built This City

A few major buildings under construction, and the men behind them.

Why Is Boston So Ugly?

How we built the most mediocre architecture in history, and how we’re going to fix it.

Made to Order

A closer look at the interior design of Bondir Concord, where exposed brick, folk art, and plenty of Americana complement the intensely local fare.

You Gotta Lay It Down to Pick It Up

With his new restaurant, Strip, bon vivant Nick Varano is taking his fabulous show straight into the heart of Boston.

Eulogy for Louis Boston

The demise of Louis heralds a new era of Boston blandification and the triumph of the ho-hum.

Why New Boston Looks Like an Office Park

Mayor Walsh wants to transform the BRA into a functioning member of society. Here's what else he should do.

The Man With the Golden Charm

How developer Steven Samuels transformed the Fenway from a dump into a destination.