Cut to the Core: The Benefits of Gyrotonic Exercise

Gyrotonic exercise produces long, lean bodies—and may reduce the need for surgery.
gyrotonic exercise boston

Miriam Barbosa, Gyrotonic Master Trainer (Photo by Lumos Studio / Styling by Molly Shuster)

Stop by Charles River Gyrotonic, in Allston, and you might glimpse Gisele Bündchen among the participants performing circular movements on a Pulley Tower machine, which looks a bit like a medieval torture device.

Not only does this low-impact regimen strengthen spines, tone cores, and improve flexibility, but owner Veronique Breen says the repeated rotation helped fix her knee. “I had an MRI, and they realized that [the knee] had improved” with the exercises, she says.

It makes sense, then, that Gyrotonic machines are being used as part of physical-therapy programs at rehab centers around town. And in a recent study published by the New England Journal of Medicine, doctors at Brigham and Women’s Hospital found that physical therapy is just as effective for a torn meniscus as surgery.

Martha Mason, a partner at Cambridge’s Upward Spiral Studio, says she often sees clients who have disk injuries, scoliosis, hip issues, and other ailments—many of whom use Gyrotonics as a way to avoid going under the knife. “You can get a workout while you are seated,” Mason says. “It’s like physical therapy on steroids, and you feel incredible afterward.”


Melissa Malamut
Melissa Malamut Melissa Malamut, Senior Editor, Health, at Boston Magazine mmalamut@bostonmagazine.com