Massachusetts Has the Lowest Uninsured Rate in the Country After Obamacare

According to a WalletHub study, all but 3.28 percent of Commonwealth inhabitants have health insurance.

Source: WalletHub

 
In news that should be unsurprising, Massachusetts has the lowest percentage of residents without health insurance in the country.

A study from WalletHub looked at each state’s number of uninsured residents in 2014, as well as the change in percentage of insured citizens between 2010—when Obamacare reforms began—and 2014. At 3.28 percent, Massachusetts has the lowest number of residents without health insurance, as well as the smallest rate of change since Obamacare’s rollout (1.13 percent). Texas came in last, with about 19 percent of its inhabitants uninsured—well above the national average of 11.7 percent.

The findings are not shocking, since the Massachusetts Health Care Reform has required most adults in the Commonwealth to have health insurance since 2006. As such, Massachusetts health insurance rates have been among the best in the country for years.

In addition to overall health insurance rates, WalletHub analyzed figures across a number of different demographics. Other data points for Massachusetts include:

  • The difference between uninsured white residents and uninsured black residents is 3.67 percent, and 3.91 percent between white and Hispanic residents.
  • Approximately 67 percent of Commonwealth inhabits are privately insured.
  • The difference in insurance rates between higher-income and lower-income households was 3.35 percent.
  • The percentage of uninsured children was even lower than adults: 1.54 percent, also the lowest rate in the nation.

Jamie Ducharme Jamie Ducharme, Health Editor at Boston Magazine jducharme@bostonmagazine.com


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