The Ultimate Guide to Juice Bars in Boston

We found 16 places to find juices and smoothies around town, from classic kale drinks to beet-infused ‘Unicorn Blood.’

Juice Bars in Boston

Credits Below

Sure, our city’s proliferation of juice bars may be reaching a fever pitch, but if that means we can get a nutrient-packed drink anytime we want—in any neighborhood we want—then we say bring it on. Whether you’re looking for a “cleanse” or just a refreshing post-workout smoothie, you can find the freshly pressed pick-me-up you’re looking for at these 16 juice bars. (List is alphabetical.)

1. Boston ProJuice

ProJuice is hopping onto the juicing-trend bandwagon more literally than most: with an actual bus. This juice shuttle starts prowling the streets this spring.

Try: Your own creation—ProJuice founder and service industry vet Paul Cunningham has announced plans to offer a DIY juicing service.

Boston ProJuice, twitter.com/BostonProJuice.

2. Cocobeet (Government Center)

Cocobeet bills itself as “Boston’s original organic juice bar,” and they guarantee that all their ingredients are raw, vegan, gluten-free, GMO-free, organic, and locally sourced.

Try: The Green Genes (kale, spinach, cucumber, celery, apple, parsley, lemon, and ginger).

100 City Hall Plaza, Boston, 857-263-8598, cocobeet.com.

3. E.T.C. Juicery (North End)

Holistic medicine played a formative role in the life of E.T.C. Juicery founder Melina DiPaola, after medical treatments for a childhood brain tumor led her to experiment with non-invasive health regimens. DiPaola’s North End-based juice business stands for “electron transport chain,” and was only offered as online orders until she opens up her brick and mortar shop this spring.

Try: The Spiced Apple (Fuji apple, ginger, clove, and paprika).

420 Commercial St., Boston, etcjuicery.com.

4. Fruitata Organic Juice and Smoothies (Back Bay)

Mall shopping trips generally fall into one of two categories: the fun retail therapy kind, and the grueling death march kind. If your latest Pru excursion is turning into the latter, you can take comfort in the idea that a restorative beverage is within easy grasp. Check out semi-hidden gem Fruitata, a juice stand peddling a wide assortment of made-in-front-of-your-face smoothies and juices.

Try: The Cairo Chard (cucumber, celery, chard, pear, and lemon).

800 Boylston St., Boston, 617-982-6147, fruitata.com.

5. Jugos (Back Bay)

One of chef Ken Oringer’s neighborhood staples, Jugos serves not only a wide range of juices, but also intriguing menu items with a South-of-the-border twist—think raw coconut “ceviche” with avocado, drenched in lime and spiced up with ginger and jalapeño.

Try: The #7 (pear, pineapple, green apple, lime, and mint).

145 Dartmouth St., Boston, 617-418-9879, visitjugos.com.

6. The Juice Box (South Boston)

As Southie’s first dedicated juice bar, the Juice Box specializes in dairy- and gluten-free juices and smoothies, featuring add-ons such as protein, goji berries, chia seeds, hemp seeds, and whey.

Try: The 02127 (chia seeds, banana, acai berry juice, almond milk, honey, and vanilla).

359 W. Broadway, Boston, 857-930-4510, dailysqueezeboston.com.

7. Juice Press (Chestnut Hill)

New York export Juice Press is slated to open in Chestnut Hill this summer, bringing with it organic, vegan, and kosher cold-pressed juices and smoothies, plus a salad bar, soups, and raw foods galore.

Try: The Pink Punk (beet juice blended with pineapple, strawberry, and shredded ginger).

33 Boylston St., Suite 3320, Chestnut Hill, juicepress.com.

8. The Juicery (North End)

This charming little juice chain has earned its high-concept name, proving popular enough in New Hampshire to have spawned a North End incarnation. Due to the made-to-order nature of their juices, the service at this tiny gleaming-white storefront can be a little slow, but the Juicery’s juices and smoothies are well worth the wait. Instant-gratification types can also grab chia puddings and bottled kombucha drinks from their case.

Try: The Jungle (spinach, parsley, cucumber, celery, and apple).

66 Cross St., Boston, 617-936-4010, juicery.com.

9. Liquiteria (Harvard Square)

This venerable NYC juice chain made a splash this past winter by announcing its imminent debut in Cambridge. Keep your eyes peeled for the store’s opening later this spring.

Try: The Killer XX (apple, lemon, ginger, and cayenne).

1430 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, liquiteria.com.

10. Mother Juice (Kendall Square)

First, they Kickstarted their way into existence with a roving juice truck. Then, Mother Juice planted their “garden to glass” concept in a brick-and-mortar storefront. In addition to organic juices with geektastic names and vegan snacks, they offer deliveries and cleanses.

Try: The Unicorn Blood (beet, carrot, celery, watermelon, and pineapple).

625 E Kendall St., Cambridge, 617-286-6580, motherjuiceboston.com.

11. Nourish Your Soul (Fort Point and Medford)

After unexpectedly finding herself a widow, Nourish Your Soul owner Susan Cabana found a new zeal for healthy living and wellness, and thus the inspiration for this juice business was born. You can purchase these cold-pressed juices from Nourish Your Soul’s two brick-and-mortar locations in Fort Point and Medford, or you can have them delivered straight to your door with their cleanse delivery program.

Try: The Grapefruit Green (kale, grapefruit, pear, cucumber, mint, and dandelion).

15 Channel Center St., Boston, 17 Playstead Rd., Medford, 888-995-8423, nourishyoursoul.com.

12. Pressed (Beacon Hill)

This Beacon Hill juice shop has made a splash with its unique ingredients. Their green juices go beyond the usual apple/spinach/cucumber paradigm; Pressed infuses theirs with such intriguing ingredients as fennel, mint, and lemongrass. You can even cool down with a paleta (a popsicle made with fresh fruit). And don’t overlook the rest of the menu, which is filled with nosh-friendly fare designed by a notable NYC vegan chef.

Try: The Zinc [Zn] (sweet apple, green apple, cucumber, lime, mint, kale, and wheatgrass).

120 Charles St., Boston, 857-350-3103, pressedboston.com.

13. Pure Cold Press Juice & Salad Bar (Coolidge Corner)

The owner of neighborhood Middle Eastern restaurant, Rami’s, is launching Pure Cold Press on May 1. In addition to their lineup of cold-pressed juices (as well as booster shots), their wide-ranging menu is set to include kosher and herbivore-friendly fare, including sandwiches, soups, and salads (in a Mason jar, of course).

Try: The Rooster (orange, lemon, grapefruit, and liquid cayenne).

326 Harvard St., Brookline, purecoldpress.com.

14. Revolution Juice (Back Bay)

With a menu that features only whole-foods and plant-based items, Revolution Juice serves up both cold-pressed and centrifugal juices, as well as smoothies, fruit sorbet bowls, Aeropress coffee, and a variety of date-derived “Dateorades.”

Try: The Lemon Green (kale, celery, cucumber, grapefruit, apple, lemon, and ginger).

150 Huntington Ave., Boston, 857-233-4313, revolutionjuice.com.

15. Stacy’s Juicebar (Needham Center)

In professing their passion for fresh produce, Stacy’s Juicebar assures us, “We don’t even own a can opener!” What they do have is more than two dozen signature juice and smoothie offerings. They’re also committed to using every part of the proverbial buffalo: Their leftover pulp goes into house-made soups and baked goods.

Try: The Xtreme Green (kale, romaine, celery, cucumber, green apple, parsley, lemon, and ginger).

1257 Highland Ave., Needham, 781-444-5842, stacysjuicebar.com.

16. Thirst Juice Co. (Downtown)

Peddling a bevvy of cold-pressed juices, smoothies, acai bowls, and small batch house-made soups, Thirst prides itself on being “the place you go to try green juice for the first time and discover that you actually like it.”

Try: The Melon Ball (cantaloupe, kale, apple, and ginger).

44 School St., Boston, thirstjuiceco.com.

 

Photos (left to right, from top) via Shutterstock (1, 4, 5, 6); provided (2, 3, 7, 8, 9)

  • http://obatkistacoklat.gov7.net/ osvaldo77

    In professing their passion for fresh produce, Stacy’s Juicebar assures
    us, “We don’t even own a can opener!” What they do have is more than two
    dozen signature juice and smoothie offerings. They’re also committed to
    using every part of the proverbial buffalo: Their leftover pulp goes
    into house-made soups and baked goods. obat kista coklat tradisional