Natick Youth Doesn't Like Somerville's Finest

I’ve watched enough cop shows to know how serving a warrant goes. A bunch of good-looking detectives knock on the door, hear some commotion, then a muscular cop either kicks in or jabs a battering ram through the door. The suspect, who’s typically in a less-than-complete state of dress, is caught flailing a little, looking a little pathetic and guilty. (And cue the sound.)

So I know that police are ready for a scrape when they drive up to a place with a warrant in envelope. But I bet the police weren’t quite expecting the verbal tirade they allegedly (I guess) received from some Natick kid when they tried to serve an arrest warrant on someone living at the same address. Somerville Patch reports the youth, who is not named because he is underage, answered a knock on the door with a “What the [expletive] do you want?” Of course, the police wanted to be let in, and the kid, well, the kid wasn’t having it. “[Expletive] you…you ain’t coming in,” the kid reportedly, allegedly said.

Then the script normalized a bit: Police saw a man inside, thought to be the guy they had the warrant for, and so they knocked out a screen and jumped through the window in pursuit. So what did our little gatekeeper do? He allegedly shoved the cop back onto the porch, then followed it up with another shove with landed the detective on his butt, injuring his hand and elbow.

A few other police jumped on the kid, allegedly, and struggled with him while the kid “continued to spew anti-police comments from the top of his lungs,” according to Somerville Patch quoting a Somerville police report. Once cuffed, the kid still wasn’t done. He managed to liberate one of his shoes and throw it at a nearby police car. Maybe they handcuff juveniles’ hands in front of them or something. Otherwise, that kid is contortionist.

So anyway, police arrested the kid (duh) and another woman who was on the scene creating a scene. And the target of their visit, Omar Muhammed? He got away. That’s very un-TV like.

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