Wes Welker's Wife Is Not a Ray Lewis Fan

On Facebook, the Patriots receiver’s wife spouts off about the polarizing linebacker.

Update Jan. 22, 2013: The Globe reports that Welker's wife has, predictably, released a statement apologizing to Lewis.

Original Post: For a professional football player, Facebook can be a dangerous place—even if he’s not the one writing offensive status updates. After the Ravens beat the Patriots on Sunday, Anna Burns Welker, wife of New England receiver Wes Welker, decided to take out her anger on Ray Lewis. Here’s what she wrote:

“Proud of my husband and the Pats. By the way, if anyone is bored, please go to Ray Lewis’ Wikipedia page. 6 kids, 4 wives. Acquitted for murder. Paid a family off. Yay. What a hall of fame player! A true role model!”

The post, which The Big Lead first got a hold of this morning, isn’t all that shocking. But it is slightly inaccurate. As Chris Strauss at USA Today points out: Lewis has never been married. Also, last time I checked, this year the Patriots employed receiver Donte’ Stallworth, who once pled guilty to DUI manslaughter.

The Ray Lewis Experience is indeed insufferable. But at this point, ripping him—at least the way Patriots fans do it—has become an obnoxious cliché. “Each of the many thousands of Patriots fans I saw at the game, heard on talk radio, or narrowly dodged at the tailgate or weird outdoor mall used the same word when asked about the Ravens: MAHDAHRAH. How can the Ravens fans root for this MAHDAHRAH Ray Lewis?” Jim Newell wrote on Grantland. “He FREAKIN' MAHDAHED TWO GUYS, YOU KNOW THAT?”

Look, I get it. Burns Welker was clearly upset that her husband’s team lost. It’s emotional. Hell, look how Gisele Bundchen reacted last February after the Patriots lost the Super Bowl. But perhaps Burns Welker should’ve taken a deep breath before spouting off. I’m not sure what kind of privacy settings she has on her account, but Facebook is a public place. And now, it’s Welker—not his wife—who will probably have to clean up the mess.

  • agingcynic

    All due respect, about a third of the entries on the Boston Daily blog could also use a cooling off period. A week or so seems about right.