State Police: Wait a Minute, Those Aren’t Cheetos

Officers seized more than 2,400 oxycodone pills hidden inside the container.

By | Boston Daily |
State Police

Photo Courtesy of State Police

Drug dealers have to be pretty crafty when trying to move their product around. But even when they try to mask bags of drugs by stuffing them in Cheetos containers, it’s no match for the wits of the Massachusetts State Police.

In a picture posted by officials online Tuesday, officers said they bagged a suspect toting around more than 2,400 Oxycodone pills in Sturbridge over the weekend. The photo indicates that the drugs were stashed inside of the container.

According to the photo posted by State Police on Facebook, the Cheetos can had a removable bottom, which had more than 20 bags of the drug stashed underneath.

From the report:

Massachusetts State Trooper Scott Driscoll assigned to the State Police Barracks in Sturbridge was on patrol in the town of Sturbridge when he stopped a motor vehicle for motor vehicle offenses. As a result of an investigation and subsequent search of the motor vehicle several plastic bags containing narcotics was located. Trooper Driscoll, assisted by Trooper Nick D’Angelo, located approximately 2,400 pills believed to be a Class B substance Oxycodone.

Oxycodone is considered a “semi-synthetic opioid” that produces effects similar to heroin. Massachusetts has been plagued with an opioid epidemic in recent years—even taking the title as one of the worst states in the country in terms of overdoses and use of this particular type of drug.

The Cheetos bust isn’t the first odd drug run-in that State Police have had in the Western part of the state in recent months.

Back in late December, officers pulled over a carload of suspects that allegedly had 1,200 bags of heroin in their vehicle, many of which were marked “Obama Care,” and “Kurt Cobain.”

A spokesman from the department claimed that it was common for alleged dealers to mark their brand with clever titles as a way of marketing their personal product.