Best Sandwiches in Boston

There’s never been a better time to be a pastrami-worshiping, Parmesan-loving, prosciutto-craving sandwich eater in this town. The best of the city, served between two slices of bread.

no 6


 

no 7

five year old 1

Even the most humble of lunchtime staples, the peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich, has been rebooted as a too-serious-for-its-own-good, artisanal-nut- butter concoction in restaurants citywide. But we wondered: Could these Gen-Y PB & Js pass the ultimate litmus test of authenticity—the discerning palate of a five-year-old? We asked J.P. resident Finuala Nevins (daughter of Boston design director Eric Mongeon)—who, at home, prefers Teddie smooth peanut butter, Bonne Maman raspberry preserves, and lightly toasted whole wheat bread—to take a few for a spin.

☆ The Winner
Tatte Bakery & Café: CB & J (house cashew butter, strawberry jam on brioche)
“The jam and [cashew] butter is really good, and I like how the bread is really thick. I really like it.”

☆ Runner-Up
Saus: CBJ (crunchy Biscoff spread, bananas, and “berry berry” sauce on wheat bread)
“I like that it’s kind of sweet. I like the bananas, too.”

3 Little Figs: Lil Figgy (almond butter, banana, honey, and cinnamon on seven-grain bread)
“I only love the banana part. That’s what I love.”

Fornax Bread Company: Fruity Breakfast Sandwich (banana, almonds, apple slices, and Nutella on boule)
“It tastes weird, because, like, the chocolate and the [fruit] together tastes weird and I really don’t like it.… I like the bread.”

Rifrullo: House nut butter, Granny Smith apples, and a sprinkle of salt on cinnamon-nut bread
“It just tastes weird…. The nut bread was yucky.” (Editor’s note: Finuala’s parents do, however, heartily endorse the melted Taleggio sandwich with wilted greens and onions—a sandwich suited perfectly for grownups.)

illustration by sam kerr

 

no 8

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

 

no 9

Photograph by PJ Couture

Photograph by PJ Couture

Long before nose to tail was de rigueur, Mike’s City Diner chef-owner Jay Hajj was getting resourceful with the birds he roasted for his signature turkey dinner. The “Mike’s Famous Pilgrim” sandwich became a catch-all for the poultry leftovers, with pan drippings and turkey stock bolstering both garlicky French-bread stuffing and thick brown gravy. Diners can choose from lean white turkey breast or rich pulled thigh meat, which is then layered with the stuffing, gravy, and a house cranberry spread on a braided sesame roll.
mikescitydiner.com



Leah Mennies
Leah Mennies Leah Mennies, Senior Food Editor at Boston Magazine lmennies@bostonmagazine.com