Boston Magazine May Cover

Stories from the Boston Marathon

The shoes that form our May cover story are a few of the many, many more worn by people on April 15, 2013. Whether you ran, attended, became a first responder, or watched from around the world, we invite you to submit a photo of your shoes and tell us your story from the 117th Boston Marathon.

  • caroline
    Caroline Suttlehan20 YonkersNew York

    I’m not much of a runner, so my goal was simply to finish—which made walking away at 25.8 hard to swallow. But I’m lucky to be here and lucky to have my parents.

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  • Running shoes (take 2)
    Kristine Chew35 VancouverBC - Canada

    Shock, anger, grief, disbelief, and sorrow were just a few of the emotions I experienced in the days after the marathon.

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  • nelly
    Thanh Nelly Do24 Cambridge

    The nonprofit I was about to run for is a creditable one with a rich history in cancer research, so I knew I wouldn’t have to worry when it came to fundraising. The toughest task was the training.

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  • teven Wagner
    Steven Wagner20 Chestnut Hill

    I hope that marathon spirit never dies in Boston. It is unlike anything else.

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    Kristen Souza

    Although the day has been clouded by this awful event, I choose to cherish the moments that the spirit of the marathon is about.

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  • image
    Danielle Chaplick30 Brookline

    Part of me is still stuck in that moment of utter disbelief when I was told that bombs had been ignited and people were injured or dead.

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  • photo
    Erica Soma23 Boston

    The thought of two very important people being dead because they came to support me, and not having a phone to contact them, was probably the worst feeling I have ever felt in my entire life.

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  • IMG_0512
    Sarah Hunt31 Brookline

    The range of emotions from being on such a high from running my first marathon combined with the horrific tragedy is all hard to work through and comprehend. How can the excitement of running the Boston Marathon be coupled with such sadness?

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  • BostonShoesIwore
    Scott Herman38 ManchesterCT

    I felt helpless. I couldn’t help anyone around me who had questions about the finish line, and I couldn’t find my friend, running buddy, and high school teammate who may have been in danger.

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  • shoes1
    Tammy Grella39 LitchfieldConn.

    A week later, I connected with the people whose phones I used that day. I heard back from all of them—they’re from Virginia, Oregon, and Hawaii. We live so far apart, but we have a link that will remain for a very long time.

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  • photo
    Emily Hopwood34 Somerville

    The second bomb detonated less than 10 feet away from where I was standing. And it wasn’t so much that I felt my whole life flashing before my eyes, but instead a feeling of finality—that this would be my last thought. Then I opened my eyes; I was still alive, but I was no longer celebrating at Forum. I was in hell.

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  • tokie
    Tokie Lynn Santa BarbaraCalif.

    Living in California now, I’ve spread my love for Boston to my friends, and your heart inspired us to do the attached photo of our hiking boots on our hike last Sunday.

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  • BostonShoes
    Halina McMaster45 BellevueWash.

    The range of emotions I experienced that day was huge. Until the terror unfolded, it was truly the most amazing race I’ve had the honor of running.

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  • boston-shoes
    Velda Wilson67 BellevueWash.

    I’m moved by this heart-felt cover photo, and I share my gratitude for the brave people of Boston in a month-long tribute to the city.

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  • IMG_0182
    Joanne Barker48 Somerville

    I remember feeling on top of the world that day, like I could do anything, all because of the people who stuck around and cheered.

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  • Catherine-Mcquade
    Catherine McQuade20 Chestnut Hill

    My marathon didn’t end, though—I will run again next year, and crossing that finish line will mean more than I could have ever imagined.

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  • jeff
    Jeff Pflanz20 CliveIowa

    I find that I still need to cross the finish line—for myself, for everyone affected, and for everyone that responded.

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  • KEENS
    Judi Dodge60 AustinTexas

    I love Boston with all my heart and know the Marathon will continue on stronger than ever for many, many years to come.

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  • image1
    Erica Nash36 BellevueWash.

    My projected finish was 2:50 p.m. So, it’s chilling that I missed my pace and wasn’t at the finish during the explosion.

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  • cloe-marathon-shoes
    Cloe Axelson34 Cambridge

    I hate that so many runners weren’t able to experience the free-wheeling joy of running unabashed down the middle of Boylston Street, fueled by high fives and cheers from thousands of happy people. There’s nothing like it.

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  • 100_1951
    Christie Hamilton47 OakvilleON - Canada

    I ran because I wanted to enjoy the best spectators in the world. They did not let me down! I am so angry that these spectacular people are the ones who were hurt by the bombs.

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  • photo-22
    Janice Corkhum42 LynnfieldMass.

    The moment I saw on TV what the hell had happened. In that moment, I realized just how grateful I was to be where I was and that there are really great people on this earth, and they just all happened to be at the same place at 2:50 p.m. on Monday, April 13, 2013.

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  • image
    Sandra Gittlen42 NorthboroughMass.

    Instead of framing my medal, I am framing the poster that my school-age neighbor and her pals made for me. That moment where they cheered me on at Mile 2 is how I hope to remember that day.

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  • photo
    Meredith Kent38 NorthboroughMass.

    What strikes me about the entire day is the extreme range of emotions that I felt in one day…pure happiness and joy, pure sadness and grief, pure worry and fear.

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  • photo-13
    Caitlin Fitzgerald34 MelroseMass.

    Right after the explosions, someone locked the large glass doors of the Tannery. We took cover in the basement away from the glass walls of the first floor, feeling that there may be more blasts. I can’t say I remember anything about the basement other than the faces of the people who were there.

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    Corey Farina37 WeymouthMass.

    2013 was my first Boston Marathon experience. As a Lieutenant with the Hingham Police Department, I became part of one of the first EMS units on scene.

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  • DSC00454
    Maria Evora-Rosa40 East BridgewaterMass.

    I didn’t sleep the whole week and cried a lot. Life is slowly getting back to normal, and the images of what I saw that day are fading.

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  • photo-1
    Melissa Southwell35 MaynardMass.

    It took two weeks, five runs, and four hours and 27 minutes, but I ran 26.2 miles. This may be my only Boylston Street finish, but it is a victory. And I did it in these shoes. Boston Strong.

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  • Zara's Shoes
    Zara Bielkus31 Boston

    Perhaps part of our consciousness remains there, in that moment, for good or for bad, and therefore every time we recall it we can almost live it.

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  • fiola
    First Lieutenant Stephen Fiola32 FitchburgMass.

    People are saying was it like a war zone. We’ve been saying it’s worse.

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