10 of the Best Places to Snowshoe Near Boston

By ·

snowshoelead

Photo by Karen Neoh on Flickr/Creative Commons

Bored with skiing? Intimidated by snowboarding? Let snowshoeing become your new favorite winter sport.

Snowshoeing is truly accessible to everyone—if you can walk, you can snowshoe—and a great workout to boot. Visit these 10 locales, and you’ll be walking in a winter wonderland before you know it.

1. Arnold Arboretum

Strap on your snowshoes and explore this sprawling, horticulturally diverse park. Extra credit if you make your way to the top of Peters Hill—you’ll be out of breath, but the views make it all worthwhile.

Free. 125 Arborway, Boston, arboretum.harvard.edu.

2. Blue Hills Reservation

If you’re looking for a place to enjoy the snow, try your hand—or feet—at snowshoeing the trails of the Blue Hills Reservation. Paths are color-coded by difficulty to help you stay at your skill level.

Free. 695 Hillside Street, Milton, mass.gov.

3. Boston Nature Center

These 67 acres are home to more than 150 species of birds, 40 species of butterflies, and 350 species of plants, giving you plenty of reason to roam. Enjoy a guided snowshoe walk or go it alone from dawn to dusk.

Free. 500 Walk Hill St., Mattapan, massaudubon.org.

4. Bradley Palmer State Park

You bring the snowshoes, they’ve got the trails. Named after an attorney from the Teapot Dome Scandal, this state park offers 721 acres of rolling meadows and old carriage roads ready for exploration.

$5 for parking. 40 Asbury St., Topsfield, mass.gov.

5. Gore Place

With 50 acres to explore, Gore Place offers a plethora of ways to make the most of your snow day. If you don’t have your own snowshoes, rental pairs are available.

$10 per hour. 52 Gore St., Waltham, goreplace.org.

6. Hale Reservation

Try one of Hale Reservation’s five trails, ranging from a .9-mile path that explores rock outcroppings to a 2.5-miler that winds its way through rolling hills. Either way, enjoy taking the scenic route.

Free. 80 Carby St., Westwood, halereservation.org.

7. Harold Parker State Forest

Harold Parker’s 3,000 acres of forest contain several mapped trails that are ripe for snowshoeing. And if you’re feeling adventurous, there are more than 35 miles of logging roads and trails for off-road hikers, just waiting to be explored.

$8 for parking. Middleton Road, North Andover, mass.gov.

8. Walden Pond

Pretend you’re Henry David Thoreau as you gaze upon the scenery that inspired Walden. Plus, you can get your cardio in as you journey through the property to see a replica of the author’s cabin.

$8 for parking. 915 Walden St., Concord, mass.gov.

9. Weston Ski Track

Even if there’s no natural snow on the ground, Weston Ski Track makes its own. Take an introductory snowshoeing lesson to master the skills you need to trek this nearly 9.5-mile course.

$20 for lessons, plus $16 for shoe rental. 190 Park Road, Weston, skiboston.com.

10. World’s End

The rolling hills of this 251-acre former island offer delightful walking and snowshoeing trails for those who are itching to leave snow prints. And it’s a perfect place for a family photo with views of the Boston skyline, only 15 miles away.

$6 admission. Martin’s Lane, Hingham, thetrustees.org.

Source URL: https://www.bostonmagazine.com/health/2017/02/13/snowshoe-boston/