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Meet the Founders of Dove and Donkey and Tardy Donkey

Jadine Greenaway and Sheila Galligan launched their two textile-centric businesses earlier this year.


Portrait by Ali Campbell

If you asked the universe, it would likely consider uniting Jadine Greenaway (pictured left) and Sheila Galligan one of its greatest successes. The longtime friends are the forces behind Dove and Donkey, a new online home-essentials company, and the ensuing Tardy Donkey, a collection of elevated everyday apparel. It’s a long way from the pair’s first meeting in 2006, when then-interior designer Galligan became one of Greenaway’s clients as a Barneys sales associate. But, Greenaway says, going into business together is a natural progression of the “mutual respect” the two have long cultivated for each other.

The result is two establishments with gorgeous textiles at their centers. Designed by Galligan, Dove and Donkey’s products include alpaca-wool throws spun in Peru and handpainted cotton-canvas placemats. Tardy’s cotton tees and French terry hoodies, meanwhile, are each the brainchild of both women. “These companies are our babies, and I know Sheila’s vision very much aligns with my own,” Greenaway says. Galligan agrees: “I always wanted to create tangible products, so I just love this.”

Here, the pros share what else they’re loving right now.

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Monique Péan earrings

SG: I love these because they are so easy to wear. Her jewelry is so beautifully sculptural and, better yet, she only uses recycled metals and repurposed or fair-trade-certified stones.

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Frame “Ali” High-Rise Skinny Jeans

JG: This is my absolute favorite fit. From the front to the back, they win! I stopped counting how many pairs I have in different colors and lengths. I just love them.

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Mila Moursi “Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF 30”

JG: For years I’ve searched for an SPF that doesn’t feel heavy and leaves no chalky residue on my skin. This fits the bill—it’s sheer, virtually fragrance-free, and has a completely matte finish.

Pablo Boneu (Three minutes with Glenda/Third movement, 2015, Photograph printed on two juxtaposed and manually intervened warps)

Pablo Boneu’s photographs

SG: This Argentinian artist creates pieces that challenge your perception of things. His photographs are made up of successive layers of orderly threads, but as you stare at the image, you realize that there are a whole lot of contradictions.

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Jill Rosenwald mini “Belly” bowls

JG: Jill’s so cool and so are these bowls. These cuties come in whatever colors and prints she dreams up. Use them for anything you wish—I use mine for berries.