Restaurant News

The Landmark Center Will Have a Food Hall

Time Out Market is opening its third global dining and cultural center in the historic Fenway building.
time out market

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OK, it’s not the Wegmans news Fenway residents have been waiting for, but a bustling food hall may make up for it. In 2019, the former Landmark Center at 401 Park Drive will be home to Time Out Market, a one-stop shop with restaurants, bars, a cooking school, and more.

The project is the latest from Fenway visionaries Samuels & Associates, and its institutional investor J.P. Morgan. It’s in conjunction with the global media company Time Out, which opened its first marketplace in Lisbon in 2014. Boston will be its second U.S. project; a 2018 debut is anticipated for an in-the-works Miami location. Time Out Market will anchor the redesigned ground floor of the historic art deco building. In Lisbon, market boasted more than 3 million visitors in 2016.

The Boston food hall is a win for both Samuels and Time Out, per today’s press release. Samuels “courted” Time Out as “a visionary partner who could create an eclectic food hall that reflected the very top tier of what Boston has to offer,” says CEO Steve Samuels. And the Fenway neighborhood is “a dining destination and vibrant cultural hub with easy accessibility—it is a fantastic back drop for Time Out Market,” says that company’s CEO, Didier Souillat.

Time Out “editorially curates” its food halls. The company has city magazines, online content, live events, and more products in 108 global cities, including in Boston. With a focus on local chefs, restaurants, mixologists, and artists, it promises to “bring the best of the city together under one roof.” That means 16 restaurants, two bars, a cooking school, and retail shops across more than 21,000 square feet. Garage doors will open onto the Samuels-developed 1.1-acre public park, so there are opportunities for outdoor dining and entertainment, too.

Local firm Elkus Manfredi Architects are designing the space, and maximizing the 1929 building’s attributes.

Stay tuned for more details on this exciting new development in one of the city’s fastest changing neighborhoods. “We look forward to them transforming one of Boston’s most historic buildings into a culinary and cultural gem,” Samuels says.


Jacqueline Cain Associate Food Editor at Boston Magazine jcain@bostonmagazine.com