Weekender: Paris

The City of Lights sparkles brightest in the winter.

Hotels

hotel du petit moulin

Photograph by Amélie Dupont, Paris Tourist Office

Luxe Lodging

Behind an unassuming boulangerie storefront in the heart of the Marais lies the Hôtel du Petit Moulin, a boutique hideaway filled with charm and intrigue. With interior design by Christian Lacroix, each of the 17 rooms has its own eccentric flair. Bold patterns and colors on every surface combine motifs from each ­design, from ­Baroque to midcentury modern. A bonus: Guests have access to the Spa de la Reine, located in Petit Moulin’s neighboring sister hotel, Pavillon de la Reine.

Hôtel du Petit Moulin, 29/31 rue de Poitou, hotelpetitmoulinparis.com.

Hôtel Récamier

Tucked away in a picturesque corner of the Place Saint-Sulpice, the six-story, 24-room Hôtel Récamier is the paragon of quiet elegance. Jean-Louis Deniot’s glamorous interiors show off the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood at its finest, with wrought-iron balconies, canopied beds, and staircases accented by oval niches with artful busts.

3 Bis, Place Saint-Sulpice, hotelrecamier.com.


Restaurants

Photograph by Guillame de Laubier

Photograph by Guillame de Laubier

Tall Order

At the three-story Les Chouettes, designed by Spanish architect Lázaro Rosa-Violán, each ­art deco–inspired level has a unique vibe: The main dining room on the first floor is strictly see-and-be-seen, but climb the spiral staircase, and you’ll find cozy leather armchairs and private nooks where you can sip your wine or cocktail incognito. The menu changes every two weeks, so you’ll discover a new dish each time you visit.

Les Chouettes, 32 rue de Picardie, restaurant-les-chouettes-paris.fr.

Ellsworth

This year, the American duo behind 2012’s immensely popular Verjus restaurant and wine bar opened Ellsworth, a friendly little bistro in the upscale Palais Royal neighborhood. Small plates emphasize seasonal ingredients, keeping the menu fresh. For the homesick, a few staples skew toward stateside comfort food, like fermented-milk fried chicken and malt ice cream with chocolate sorbet.

34 Rue de Richelieu, ellsworthparis.com.

Clamato

You’ll have to book months in ­advance to score a spot at chef ­Bertrand Grébaut’s celebrated restaurant ­Septime. Lucky for the last-minute traveler, his latest buzzed-about seafood spot, Clamato, doesn’t take ­reservations—and it’s right next door. The menu, venturing from scallops with brown butter and cauliflower purée to octopus carpaccio with grapefruit pulp and anchovy, changes daily. Go early or late in the evening to snag a romantic high-top table for two.

80 Rue de Charonne, septime-charonne.fr.


Exhibits

Photographs courtesy of the Musée d’Orsay (Jeunes suffragettes faisant la promotion de l’exposition de la Women’s Exhibition de Knightsbridge, Londres, Mai 1909, by Christina Broom, courtesy of Museum of London; Self-portrait with camera, by Margaret Bourke-White, courtesy of Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Digital Image Museum Associates/Art Resource NY/Scala, Florence; Beim Rennen in Longchamp, 1936, by Regina Relang, courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

Photographs courtesy of the Musée d’Orsay (Jeunes suffragettes faisant la promotion de l’exposition de la Women’s Exhibition de Knightsbridge, Londres, Mai 1909, by Christina Broom, courtesy of Museum of London; Self-portrait with camera, by Margaret Bourke-White, courtesy of Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Digital Image Museum Associates/Art Resource NY/Scala, Florence; Beim Rennen in Longchamp, 1936, by Regina Relang, courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

Femmes Fatales

“Who’s Afraid of Women Photographers” highlights the often-overlooked contributions females have made to the medium—both technologically and artistically. More than a century of work is a lot to cover—that’s why this first-of-its-kind exhibit is being shared between two museums. Part one, from 1839 through 1919, can be seen at the Musée de l’Orangerie; the Musée d’Orsay explores part two, covering works from 1918 through 1945.

“Who’s Afraid of Women Photographers” runs until 1/24, Musée de l’Orangerie, Jardin des Tuileries, musee-orangerie.fr; Musée d’Orsay, 62 rue de Lille, musee-orsay.fr.

“Warhol, Unlimited,”

For the first time in Europe, all 102 canvases of Andy Warhol’s “Shadows” series will be shown at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. To celebrate, the museum will also display dozens of the artist’s other works, all with his trademark emphasis on serial images.

Runs until 2/7, 11 Avenue du Président Wilson, mam.paris.fr.


Michele Snow Michele Snow, Art Director of Boston Home and Boston Weddings msnow@bostonmagazine.com