July 2007 Issue

Department

The Entitlement Slayers

D. A. Hayden and Michael Wilder say they have the cure for the inflated self-regard and general cluelessness today’s young workers bring to the business world. A word to parents and prospective clients: This brand of advice isn’t for the meek.

The Rag That Would Save Newspapers

Our new daily, BostonNow, is easy to poke fun at. But the ideas it’s built on just might be what the foundering news business needs.

The Maestro to the Rescue

The Boston Pops’ Fourth of July fireworks spectacular keeps getting more horrifyingly trashy with each passing year. And James Levine is the only man who can stop it.

Restaurants

Dining Out: A Room of Her Own

In her solo second act, chef Jody Adams reinvents Rialto as an elegant Italian eatery. There’s much to love in the new translation—and a lot of room for growth.

Chickened Out

As his bistro marks its 20th, Gordon Hamersley admits he’s getting a little tired of its signature offering.

Feature

Straight Outta Weston

Pat Demling has seen her Hip Zepi stores get robbed, shot up, and blasted by the mayor for selling “Stop Snitchin’” T-shirts. She’s beloved by her employees, and resented by customers who say she’s exploiting the poor. It’s a tricky business, being a white, Republican, tennis-loving, one-time suburban mom running a growing hip-hop-wear empire.

New Wave Designs: City Dwellers Spread Out, Go Green

Two architects build an eco-conscious Vineyard com-pound around their very own miniature town common.

When Race Enters the Equation

More than half of all MIT professors do not receive tenure. When African-American stem cell researcher James Sherley learned he was among this unhappy majority, he accused the university of racism, then launched a hunger strike to ensure his complaint got a national airing—plunging a campus accustomed to working with hard numbers into a messy, emotionally charged controversy.